Send More Info
Apply Now
Classroom Login
Call Now
Call Now 855-300-1469

BUS 3607 Marketing Research


Week #1

Module

Breakfast pizza and diet water. These might not sound like winning ideas, but marketing research led the way for some of today's largest companies to think otherwise. This week, we will identify the steps of the marketing research process and discover the importance of problem definition.

After completing this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Assess the rationale for the steps involved in the marketing research process
  • Define marketing research and illustrate it with an example
  • Highlight factors affecting the problem definition process
  • Identify the pitfalls of defining a research problem from either a too broad or too narrow perspective 

Lecture

Introduction

Dr. Nicole DeCaro explains in this introductory lecture that if you have an interest in investigation or detective work from a business perspective, marketing research may be for you.

Lecture

What Marketing Is

In this lecture, we define marketing, explore the importance of marketing mix and segmentation, and consider the methods and goals for marketing research.

Week #2

Module

What is the difference between qualitative and quantitative research? If secondary data is the quickest and least expensive information to gather, why should a researcher not rely solely on it? This week, uncover the answers to these questions as we explore marketing research methodologies.

After completing this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Appraise the interrelationship between qualitative and quantitative research
  • Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of secondary data
  • Recognize the international difficulties in implementing survey and observation methods
  • Evaluate the importance of the government census data as a major source of secondary data
  • Draw a conclusion as to the ethical responsibility of confidentiality

Lecture

Why Some Research Fails

Do you remember the New Coke debacle of the mid-1980s? Relive the moment or learn about it for the first time as we discuss the reasons research fails – sometimes miserably.

Week #3

Module

Marketing success in one country doesn't automatically translate to success in another. This week, we identify steps in the global marketing research process and discuss the differences that can influence the way a product or message is perceived. We also explore the merits and limitations of experimentation, and we discover the measurement and scaling phase of research design.  

After completing this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Evaluate pre-experimental designs and their shortcomings
  • Identify the significant features of a true experimental design and provide examples
  • Recognize the ethical limitations of misusing scale descriptors
  • Argue the limits of experimentation
  • Assess why nonexperimental designs are limited for inferring cause-effect relationships

Lecture

Global Market Research: Part 1

Brazilians want four-legged washing machines, Indians like them easily movable, and the Chinese prefer them in blues and grays. We discuss these findings of the Whirlpool Corporation and identify the first four steps in global market research.

Week #4

Module

What does Gerber mean in French? And which company's slogan translated to “We Bring Your Dead Ancestors Back to Life” in Chinese? This week, we cover steps five through eight in the global market research process, which includes the importance of back and parallel translation. You will also discover the three objectives of a questionnaire and which words to use and to avoid.

After completing this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Identify difficulties in international marketing research
  • Evaluate the pros and cons of structured and unstructured questionnaires
  • Compare and contrast observational forms and questionnaires
  • Examine cultural influences on questionnaire design
  • Distinguish the difference between a parameter and a statistic

Lecture

Global Market Research: Part 2

When Mattel Toys surveyed girls around the world to identify their career of choice for a new Barbie doll, which was the most popular? What did their choice reveal about the market? In this lecture, you discover the final steps in the global market research process.

Week #5

Module

“A problem well-defined is a problem half-solved.” This week, we review the steps of the marketing research process. We also explore fieldwork, methods for collecting data, and potential pitfalls that can lead to unsuccessful interviews.

After completing this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Introduce the univariate statistical techniques
  • Highlight problems in the selection of field workers 
  • Recognize and identify the special international concerns with data preparation
  • Assess the utility of a codebook
  • Explain the significance of preliminary data analysis 

Lecture

The Steps in the Marketing Research Process: Part 1

We will discuss each step of the marketing research process, from the problem definition to the interpretation and presentation of results.

Week #6

Module

How much information is too much? How much is too little? When is it valuable, and when is it useless? What can we learn about marketing research from a travel survey conducted in Istanbul?  This week, you will consider analysis of variance, regression and discriminant analysis. You will also assess the value of research. 

After completing this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Discuss logit analysis
  • Differentiate between the different types of interactions that can occur between variables
  • Appraise the purpose and value of regression analysis
  • Explain how the five objectives of discriminant analysis applies to marketing research

Lecture

The Steps in the Marketing Research Process: Part 2

Does marketing research work? Yes and no. Explore the varying results of marketing research with an inside look at findings uncovered by Toyota, Coach leather, and Ivory soap. 

Week #7

Module

This week, we discuss factor and cluster analysis. We visit some of today’s most popular companies to apply these methods to real-world situations. We also explore the many opportunities that exist in marketing research for those with a passion for the field.

After completing this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Justify the motivation of the rotation of factors
  • Identify the steps associated with conducting factor analysis
  • Analyze the nature of surrogate variables
  • Describe the steps associated with cluster analysis
  • Give an overview of the steps in multidimensional scaling

Lecture

Marketing Career Positions

Marketing research involves a number of diverse positions and opportunities. Join Dr. DeCaro for a look at marketing research careers, salary potential, and educational requirements.

Week #8

Module

This week, we explore the final step in the marketing research process: report preparation and presentation. The report guides decisions, serves as a historical record, and, if you are a research supplier, may determine whether or not you are called upon in the future. You will also explore structural equation modeling (SEM) and take one last look at international marketing research, with real-world examples from IBM, Universal Studios, and Coca-Cola.

After completing this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Appraise the differing perspectives management and researchers have when reading a marketing research report
  • Describe the assessment of reliability
  • Examine the different types of graphs and correlate situations when they are useful. Assess the drawbacks of each
  • Explain the process of SEM and explain the various steps involved

Lecture

Past, Present, and Future Research Trends

The role of marketing researchers is changing. They are becoming highly specialized and considered much more valuable in the decision-making process.

 

 

The course description, objectives and learning outcomes are subject to change without notice based on enhancements made to the course. September 2014