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HSC 1000 Introduction to Homeland Security



Week 1


Module

What is homeland security and how is it structured? This week we will discuss the origins of Homeland Security, including its historical development.

Upon completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Discuss the history and the establishment of homeland security
  • Describe the events that lead to and altered the concept of homeland security
  • Explain the homeland security enterprise (HSE)
  • Examine how the concept of homeland security enterprise has changed priorities
  • Describe the Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR)
  • List and describe how agencies and entities other than DHS contributes to the homeland security enterprise
Introduction to Homeland Security

In this lecture, we will discuss what to expect from this course.

Lecture

The Concept and Organization of Homeland Security

What is Homeland Security? Examine how the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created and how it is organized.


Week 2


Module

This week, we will discuss the evolution of the federal government in responding to emergencies, disasters and terrorist threats before September 11, and the measures taken to address the terrorism hazard within the United Sates following the September 11 attacks.

Upon completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Describe the evolution of the federal government in responding to emergencies, disasters and terrorist threats prior to September 11, 2001
  • Describe the measures taken to address the terrorist hazard within the United States following the September 11, 2011 attacks
  • List and describe statutory measures taken prior to and after September 11, 2001
  • Describe the actions taken by DHS to address the recommendations in the 9/11 Commission report
Lecture

Historic Overview of the Terrorist Threat Part 1

Examine how the federal government's response to emergencies evolved after September 11, 2001, and how we respond to terrorist threats.

Lecture

Historic Overview of the Terrorist Threat Part 2

Discuss the laws enacted post-September 11, 2001 and the 9/11 Commission report.


Week 3


Module

This week, we will examine governmental homeland security structures and identify the roles and responsibilities of the various agencies tasked with homeland security missions at the federal, state, and local level.

Upon completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Describe the individual components that compose the Department of Homeland Security, the function of each component and other interesting facts and figures about each
  • Describe the causes and nature of major structural changes that have occurred within the Department of Homeland Security since it was established in 2002
  • Describe the federal agencies, in addition to the Department of Homeland Security, that participate in traditional homeland security activities and discuss the nature of those activities
  • Describe the various homeland security related activities that the nation’s state and local organizations participate in, and what types of assistance they provide their constituent members
Lecture

Structures and Organizational Actions Part 1 

Explore the the Department of Homeland Security's composition, functions, and overall structure.

Lecture

Structures and Organizational Actions Part 2

Discuss which federal agencies that work with DHS and the various homeland security activities.


Week 4


Module

This week, we will explain the basic elements of the intelligence community and restructuring of statutory authority based on the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission, discuss the essential intelligence agencies such as the CIA, NSA, NRO, and NGA, and examine information sharing and analysis.

Upon completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Describe the elements of the intelligence community and restructuring of statutory authority based on recommendations of the 9/11 Commission
  • Describe a detailed overview of essential intelligence agencies such as the CIA, NSA, NRO, and NGA
  • Describe the and purpose and function of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence
  • Describe Information and Sharing Analysis Centers (ISAC’s)
Lecture

Intelligence and Counter Terrorism Part 1 

Examine various roles within the intelligence community, and the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission.

Lecture

Intelligence and Counter Terrorism Part 2 

Explore the function of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, as well as how the intelligence community shares information.


Week 5


Module

This week, we will describe how large-scale emergencies are declared at each level of government and what kinds of declarations are made. We will also discuss the legislative actions taken since September 11 that affect the nations response capabilities and the roles assumed by each level of government from local to national. Finally, we will describe how the National Incident Management System and the National Response Framework guide to all-hazards emergency response to major incidents in the United States.

Upon completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Describe how large scale emergencies are declared at each level of government, and what type of declarations are made
  • Describe legislative actions taken since 9/11 terrorist attacks that affect the nations response capabilities
  • Describe the federal homeland security grants programs that are available to local and state communities
  • Describe the response roles assumed by each level of government, from local to national (including those of DHS as well as other federal agencies and offices), and by private and nonprofit organizations
  • Describe what homeland security volunteer programs exist, what each does, and how they are distributed across the country
  • Describe how the National Incident Management System and the National Response Framework guides all-hazards emergency response to major incidents in the United States
Lecture

All Hazards Emergency Response and Recovery Part 1

Examine how DHS declares large-scale emergencies and the actions take with regards to our response capabilities.

Lecture

All Hazards Emergency Response and Recovery Part 2

Identify the response roles of each level of government, the effectiveness of homeland security volunteer programs, and the purpose of NIMS and the NRF.


Week 6


Module

This week, we will define mitigation, preparedness and prevention, outline the structure of preparedness, response, and mitigation plans, describe where terrorism fits in the classical life cycle of emergency management, and discuss what community issues are involved in preparedness as well as the role of the private sector.

Upon completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Describe and understand the definitions of mitigation, preparedness and prevention
  • Describe an overview of mitigation and preparedness programs
  • Describe where terrorism fits in the classical life cycle of emergency management
  • Describe the preparedness for chemical, biological and radiological incidents
  • Describe community issues in preparedness
  • Describe private sector involvement in mitigation and preparedness
Lecture

Mitigation, Prevention and Preparedness Part 1 

What are our mitigation and preparedness and what is the life cycle of our emergency management programs?

Lecture

Mitigation, Prevention and Preparedness Part 2 

Discuss how we prepare for chemical, radiological and biological incidents, and how we can get the private sector involved.


Week 7


Module

This week, we will examine how risk communication efforts inform the public about what hazard risks they face and what they can do to prepare for or mitigate them, how the federal government performs risk communication and what role the news media has in informing the public about hazard risks. We will also discuss the mission and assumptions that serve as the basis of crisis communications and the growing role of social media and first informers in crisis communications.

Upon completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Describe how risk communication efforts inform the public about what hazard risks they face and what they can do to prepare for or mitigate them
  • Describe how the federal government performs risk communication through the ready.gov website and other efforts
  • Describe the role the news media has in informing the public about hazard risks
  • Describe how the federal government warns the public of terrorist risk through the National Terrorism Alert System (NTAS)
  • Describe the mission and assumptions that serve as the basis of crisis communications
  • Describe the growing role of social media and first responders in crisis communications
  • Describe how to build an effective disaster communications strategy
Lecture

Communications Part 1

Examine how risk communications are used to help inform the general public about hazards.

Lecture

Communications Part 2 

Discuss how the media keeps the public informed about events and the role of crisis communications.


Week 8


Module

This week, we will identify and explain several of the most pressing issues confronting the role of emergency management and disaster assistance programs in homeland security, both in general and specific to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). We will also discuss the lessons history has to offer DHS as it progresses in its difficult mission and discuss the importance of community based homeland security and improved communications.

Upon completion of this module, the student should be able to:

  • Describe how homeland security research and development funding is distributed among various federal government agencies
  • Describe what research and development efforts are performed by DHS and by what offices that work is done
  • Describe where in the federal government structure research and development are performed in the areas of mass destruction and information and infrastructure     
  • Describe the source and function of maritime homeland security research
  • Describe where homeland security research and development efforts are occurring outside of DHS
  • Describe lessons learned from the FEMA experience Describe the future of homeland security – where do we go from here
Lecture

Science, Technology and The Future of Homeland Security Part 1 

Examine how DHS research is funded and how the research is put to good use.

Lecture

Science, Technology and The Future of Homeland Security Part 2 

Identify where DHS research and development efforts are being used outside of the U.S., and the lessons we have learned from FEMA's failures.

The course description, objectives and learning outcomes are subject to change without notice based on enhancements made to the course. September 2014